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Advanced composites


One of the longer-term aims of our research is to create composite materials with advanced functionality, e.g. high-strength light-weight composites or materials with unique optical properties, based on liquid crystalline self-assembly. To turn the liquid crystal into a solid composite we can either polymerize a precursor within the liquid crystal, or we evaporate the solvent of a lyotropic liquid crystal. Or both processes can be used in concert. The motivation is the enhanced physical properties that may be expected if we can capture the long-range ordered structure of liquid crystal throughout the volume of the composite.


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Three most recent publications

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Liquid crystals in micron-scale droplets, shells, and fibers Martin Urbanski, Catherine G. Reyes, JungHyun Noh, Anshul Sharma, Yong Gang, Venkata Subba Rao Jampani, Jan P.F. Lagerwall
J. Phys,: Condens. Matter, DOI: 10.1088/1361-648X/aa5706 (2017)

ToC_Noh_AdvMat_2016
Taming Liquid Crystal Self-Assembly: The Multifaceted Response of Nematic and Smectic Shells to Polymerization
JungHyun Noh, Benjamin Henx, and Jan P. F. Lagerwall Adv., Mater, DOI 10.1002/adma.201603158 (2016)
IrenasCNC-Paper
Correlation between structural properties and iridescent colors of cellulose nanocrystalline films, M. Ličen, B. Majaron, J. Noh, C. Schütz, L. Bergström, J. Lagerwall, I. Drevenšek-Olenik, Cellulose, DOI 10.1007/s10570-016-1066-z (2016)


More publications can be found here.